The Roar Report

01 Feb

Photo of the Day- A capybara family

Steve Winter/Panthera

Panthera’s picture of the day shows a family of capybara, including a mother and her nursing babies. Capybaras like these share their homes with the jaguar, such as those living in the Brazilian Pantanal. Panthera’s scientists are working through the Pantanal Jaguar Project to protect the habitat of jaguars, capybaras, and other animal and plant species with which they share their homes.

Visit Panthera Media Director Steve Winter’s website
See more wild cat photos on our Photo page and on Flickr.

01 Feb

The Elusive Bay Cat Confirmed in Borneo’s Highlands

Panthera

One of the world’s least-known and most endangered wild cats, the bay cat, has been photographed by Panthera grantees Jedediah Brodie (Universiti Malaysia Sabah/ University of British Columbia) and Anthony Giordano (S.P.E.C.I.E.S/Texas Tech University). Their photograph is the first record of this very elusive cat in the Borneo highlands, at 1460 meters (approximately 4,800 feet). The records add to our very limited knowledge of the species, which was photographed alive for the first time only in 1998 and where most previous records are from dense lowland forest under 800 meters (approximately 2,600 feet).

31 Jan

Panthera Congratulates Conservation Council Member Glenn Close

Glenn Close

Panthera congratulates Conservation Council member, Glenn Close, on her Academy Award nomination for Best Actress in the film Albert Nobbs, in which she portrays a 19th-century Irish woman passing as a man in order to work and survive. As a founding member of Panthera's Conservation Council, Ms. Close provides actionable advice and guidance on fundamental topics relevant to the growth, development and success of Panthera. In recent years, Ms. Close has passionately supported the Great Cats and Rare Canids Act and dedicated her time to increasing Panthera's influence on public policy and access to decision makers around the world.

31 Jan

Photo of the Day

Christian Sperka

Learn more about Panthera's Project Leonardo.

Learn more about Panthera's Lion Guardian program.

Visit Christian Sperka’s website
See more wild cat photos on our Photo page and on Flickr.

30 Jan

Photo of the Day

Nick Garbutt

Learn more about Panthera's Save the Tiger Fund.
Learn more about Panthera's Tigers Forever program.
Learn more about Panthera's Tiger Corridor Initiative.

Visit Nick Garbutt’s website
See more wild cat photos on our Photo page and on Flickr.

27 Jan

Photo of the Day

Christian Sperka

Learn more about Panthera's Munyawana Leopard Project.

Visit Christian Sperka's website

See more wild cat photos on our Photo page and on Flickr.

27 Jan

CNN, BBC and Other Major News Outlets Feature Panthera’s Video of a Snow Leopard Stealing a Camera Trap in Tajikistan

Panthera

Panthera and Fauna and Flora International’s video of a snow leopard cub stealing a camera trap in Tajikistan was recently posted on a number of major news outlets’ websites, including CNN, BBC, Daily Mail, The Huffington Post,

26 Jan

Photo of the Day

Travis Bartnick

Cougar cub in tree.

Learn more about Panthera's California Cougar Project.

Learn more about Panthera's Teton Cougar Project.

See more wild cat photos on our Photo page and on Flickr.

25 Jan

Just Released: Panthera’s January Newsletter

Panthera

Panthera’s January newsletter has just been released and is filled with an array of exciting conservation stories. Watch a video of a snow leopard stealing a camera trap in Tajikistan (just featured on CNN and Daily Mail) where Panthera is partnering with Fauna and Flora International to carry out a camera trap survey and learn more about the conservation status and activities of snow leopards and their prey in this region.

24 Jan

An Unexpected Camera Trap Thief in Tajikistan (Caught on Camera!)

Panthera

It’s no secret that big cats, just like their distant cousin, the domestic house cat, are characteristically curious, particularly when it comes to Panthera’s camera traps. Wild cats and other wildlife are naturally intrigued (and sometimes even spooked) when they pass through camera traps’ infrared sensors and trigger flashes of light, or spot the glowing, red light emitted by some of Panthera’s camera trap models. Most of the time, these cats react by taking a closer, quizzical look at the camera traps, and sometimes they sniff, paw and even ‘mark’ or spray Panthera’s camera traps to identify their territories.