Cougar

24 Oct

NatGeo Cat Watch: Fumbling Cougar Kittens - Learning to Hunt

Panthera

We recently captured F99, a now 1-year old, orphaned, female cougar kitten followed by Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project (see post Why Adult Cougars Kill Each Other? for how she was orphaned and Orphaned Cougar Kittens and Their Inspiring Will to Survive for some of her adventures since). We swapped out the tiny, expandable collar that we’d given her at 5 weeks old, for a cutting-edge, solar-assisted, light-weight Iridium GPS collar.

09 Sep

The Associated Press Reports on Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project

Panthera

Dozens of media outlets, including the Miami Herald, San Francisco Gate and others, picked up a recent Associated Press story on research out of Panthera's Teton Cougar Project showing cougars are more sociable and less solitary than once thought.

01 Aug

Jackson Hole News & Guide Features Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project and Findings on ‘Cougar Communities’

Panthera

Read a new Jackson Hole News & Guide article that discusses findings from Panthera's Teton Cougar Project showing that cougars, once thought of as solitary carnivores, are much more social than scientists previously thought.

09 Jul

Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project Leader Interviewed on Cougars and ‘The Wolf Effect’

Panthera

Earlier this week, Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project Leader, Dr. Mark Elbroch, was interviewed on Defender Radio about new research from Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project and partner scientists which confirms how two key predators - cougars and wolves - interact and share their habitat in northwest Wyoming.

17 Jun

The Tico Times Reports on Panthera’s Jaguar Conservation Efforts in Costa Rica

Panthera

The Tico Times recently released an article on the proven success of new, Panthera-trained rapid response units that are helping to mitigate livestock-related conflict between farmers and jaguars throughout Costa Rica.

02 Jun

Press Release: New Global Alliance Commits $80 Million to Save the World's Wild Cats and Their Ecosystems

Panthera

Commitment Unites Donors from China, India, the United Arab Emirates and the United States to Collectively Provide $80 Million in Cornerstone Funding for Panthera's $200 Million Initiative for Wild Cats

29 Apr

Photo of the Day

© Panthera Costa Rica

Check out and share this cool pic of a cougar catching a late night snack in Costa Rica's La Selva Biological Station. If you can make out what prey species is shown, share your answer below! Cougars have the largest geographic range of any terrestrial mammal in the Western Hemisphere, extending from Alaska to the southern tip of Chile, and are known by many names, including mountain lion, puma, deer tiger, panther, catamount, and other terms. Learn more about cougars @ http://bit.ly/113bYHP & what Panthera is doing to protect the 'American Lion' in Wyoming @ http://bit.ly/hrKwWj

22 Apr

Act for Wild Cats on Earth Day

Panthera

Today is Earth Day - Are you ready to act for wild cats? Read Panthera's 5 wild cat facts and encourage your family & friends to act for wild cats! Consider making a contribution to Panthera on Earth Day as well to support the future of big cats - our planet's ultimate ecosystem guardians. 100% of your donation will go directly to Panthera's field programs, where it matters most, to protect wild cats around the world.

21 Apr

Photo of the Day

Drew Rush/National Geographic

Enjoy our precious photo of the day of a female cougar known as F59 monitored through Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project! F59 was one of five kittens born to F51 in her first litter and serves as a living legacy to her mother, who was recently killed by a local male cougar while defending her newest two kittens. Yesterday, our scientists reported that these two 7 month old kittens are alive and traveling together. Stay tuned for news on these kittens and other cougars monitored through the TCP. See incredible video footage and read about the incredible life and legacy of F51

17 Apr

F51 – Honoring the Life of a Female Cougar

Panthera

F51, an adult female cougar tracked through Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project (TCP), meandered toward the eastern edge of her range, her two female offspring bouncing like electrons in orbit around her. Who can say what a cougar thinks, but from our perspective, life seemed good for F51. The family had fed off a series of elk in quick succession, and then successfully dodged a local wolf pack that stole F51’s last kill. Her kittens were fat, healthy and growing fast.