Snow Leopard

05 Apr

Huffington Post Cat Tales: A Night in the Wild

Dr. George Schaller
Snow leopard profile, Ladakh, India

Last October, Panthera gathered stories from our scientists, researchers, and partners to document their favorite encounters with big cats in the wild. This month, read world-renowned conservationist and Panthera Vice President George Schaller's tale of a night spent under falling snow to capture the rare sight of a female snow leopard in the wild.

01 Mar

Huffington Post Cat Tales: Life Around Us

Dr. Tom McCarthy
Snow leopard walking along a mountain trail, Ladakh, India

Last October, Panthera gathered stories from our scientists, researchers, and partners to document their favorite encounters with big cats in the wild. This month, read our Director of Snow Leopard Programs Tom McCarthy's account of a sighting that still moves him, twelve years later.

30 Jul

From Desktop to Mountaintop - The Reality of Apple's Newest Icon

Panthera
Snow leopard scratching against a rock, Ladakh, India

While some of you may know the snow leopard from the amazing chase sequence in the BBC Planet Earth series, most people think 'snow leopard' pertains to Apple's latest Operating System, or the brutal and ruthless villain, Tai Lung, from last year's smash hit Kung Fu Panda. Well, snow leopards are nothing akin to Operating Systems -- nor are they brutal and ruthless in any shape or form.

20 Jun

The Quest for One of the Most Elusive Cats in the World

Steve Winter
A female snow leopard, "Eureka," and her three cubs caught on camera, South Gobi

The snow leopard is one of the most elusive cats in the world. As few as 3,500 of them may still roam the harsh, forbidding mountains of Central Asia. No one knows for sure.

15 Apr

Why Living with Big Cats is Critical for Future Generations

Alan Rabinowitz
Jaguar sitting on a log, Pantanal, Brazil

I remember the day in 2006 when I learned that ten years of effort had resulted in the designation of the world's largest tiger reserve in a remote corner of Asia. I was euphoric, until late that afternoon when I received additional news about the deaths of two local people in the area, a mother of five and a teenage boy, who had succumbed to malaria. I had met and spoken with them both during visits to their villages. Now they were considered two more unfortunates on a list whose ranks swelled every year with the oncoming rains.