Jaguar Corridor Initiative

Overview

Jaguars use and require Protected Areas, but they move beyond them in search of food, space, and in order to breed, to pass along their genes into the future. Panthera’s Jaguar Corridor Initiative aims to link core jaguar populations within the human landscape from northern Argentina to Mexico, preserving their genetic integrity so that jaguars can live in the wild forever.

Jaguars and People

Living in close proximity to America's largest cat means jaguars are faced with a series of threats: habitat loss and fragmentation, hunting by local ranchers and farmers who perceive jaguars as a threat to their livelihoods, and lack of natural prey due to overhunting by humans.

The Solution

Our first step is a map-based model of the jaguar’s ecological needs throughout its range. Then, a “tool box” of activities unfolds, from “ground-truthing” corridors so we can verify where jaguars are and where they are moving through, to managing and conserving jaguar prey species, helping ranchers with livestock husbandry improvements, working with local communities to alleviate conflict, and assisting governments with protected area management.
Conserving Jaguars from Argentina to Mexico

Jaguars, like many large, free-ranging wildlife species, are not constrained by political boundaries, nor are they as challenged or constrained by physical ones. Jaguars use and require protected areas, where their core populations can thrive.

But they move beyond protected areas, through landscapes, across rivers, over hills and mountain passes and even through areas with human development, searching for food, space to live, and security, and, ultimately, to survive and breed, passing their genes into the future.

A jaguar corridor is a cattle ranch, a citrus plantation, someone’s backyard – a place where jaguars can pass through safely and unharmed.

Jaguar resting on the bank, Pantanal, BrazilPanthera’s Jaguar Corridor Initiative seeks to realize this vision of linking core jaguar populations within the human landscape from northern Argentina to Mexico, preserving their genetic integrity so jaguars can live in the wild forever. Through multilateral partnerships, government support, and local buy-in, Panthera is the driving force behind this unique initiative, ensuring safe passage for the majestic and mysterious jaguar across its entire range.

Saving jaguars range-wide is a winning strategy for conserving vast landscapes and ecosystem functions, and preserving human health and livelihoods. While Panthera’s Jaguar Corridor Initiative is streamlined and focused on jaguars, the impacts go far beyond.

The Problem

The jaguar is the largest and most iconic cat in the Western Hemisphere. Human societies and cultures across the region have evolved for centuries with the jaguar, a charismatic species that has inspired rich myths and legends, and today serves as a national symbol for several Latin American countries.

Logging, and loss of forest, is a threat to jaguars across their rangeBut while people continue to be awed and intrigued by the jaguar, many live in fear and are intolerant of this large and wild cat, especially as forest cover is depleted, forcing jaguars to be in closer contact with humans. While the jaguar remains the top predator in the region, serves as a sign of healthy ecosystems, and exists in fair numbers in some areas, it is by no means out of harm’s way.

The jaguar is currently threatened throughout its range because of three main reasons: 

  • Dramatic habitat loss and fragmentation from the conversion of wild lands to agriculture and other development – jaguars run the risk of being confined to isolated patches, increasing the risk of extinction;
  • Direct hunting by people, such as ranchers, who view jaguars as a threat to their livelihoods;
  • Lack of natural prey, like deer and wild pigs, from overhunting by humans and habitat loss, forcing jaguars to prey on domestic animals, fueling conflict.

These threats jeopardize the jaguar’s long-term future, and are a recipe for disaster not just for this species, but for entire ecosystems.

The Solution

Despite the decimation of numerous jaguar populations and the loss of half of the jaguar’s habitat within its range, new science indicates that with urgent and strategic action, this species can not only endure, but thrive.

Panthera’s Jaguar Corridor Initiative is the most comprehensive and transformative conservation strategy ever, using a range-wide approach and a targeted set of activities, and ensuring the future of this magnificent carnivore across its entire range. Panthera is working in partnership with local communities, governments, and other conservation organizations every step of the way, to secure the long-term presence of jaguar populations and to ensure their safe passage from Mexico to Argentina.

This is built on a multi-dimensional process. Our first step is a map-based model of the jaguar’s ecological needs throughout its range. Then, a “tool box” of activities unfolds, from "ground truthing" corridors so we can verify where jaguars are and where they are moving through, to managing and conserving jaguar prey species, helping ranchers with livestock husbandry improvements, working with local communities to alleviate conflict, and assisting governments with protected area management.

Panthera is using cutting-edge science to help create and implement practical and relevant solutions to saving the jaguar.


Please click here to learn more about the Key Activities of the Jaguar Corridor Initiative. 

Panthera works in 13 of the 18 jaguar range states. Click here to read more about the work Panthera is doing in these countries.

Read Panthera's Jaguar Report Card: The State of the Jaguar.

Read Panthera's: Jaguar Corridor Initiative Brochure

Please check back shortly for more detailed information on each country in which Panthera is implementing the Jaguar Corridor.

Click here to: Meet the Jaguar

Please click here to read Panthera’s statement in response to recent questions about collaring jaguars in the Pantanal. (Also available in Portuguese)


Watch the Panthera-produced film, My Pantanal


jaguar Programs

closeup of Jaguar Jaguar Corridor Initiative | Conserving Jaguars from Argentina to Mexico
Aerial view of the Pantanal, Brazil Pantanal Jaguar Project | Bridging the Jaguar-Cattle Divide

Panthera on the Ground

Panthera’s Jaguar Corridor Initiative spans 13 of the 18 jaguar range states in Latin America. One of these being Belize - home of the Central Belize Corridor that serves as the critical link between jaguar populations in Mexico and Guatemala, and all jaguar populations south of Belize. Situated on the Caribbean Sea, Belize experiences a rainy or ‘green’ season, from June to November, and a ‘dry’ season from November to May, which locals have fittingly called the ‘fire season.’

 See a map of Belize and the Central Belize Corridor.

How you can help jaguars right now: